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Senior nutrition and nutrient intake has a huge impact on the development and progression of Alzheimer’s disease, making a brain-health diet extremely important for Canada’s seniors and elder care providers.

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4 to 6 percent of Canadians experience a form of depression called winter-onset Seasonal Affective Disorder *(SAD). Another 10 to 20 percent have milder cases. Many mistakenly write off SAD as the winter blues or cabin fever, but as a recognized type of clinical depression, SAD requires professional diagnosis and attention, the Canadian Mental Health Association advises.

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Food poisoning is especially detrimental to seniors, causing them to be sicker longer with more acute symptoms. As people age, their immune systems slow down and are not as effective in combating illnesses. For these reasons, it is critical that seniors and their caretakers are able to immediately identify the symptoms of food poisoning and seek proper medical care and treatment. It is equally important, or more so, that they follow safe food preparation and handling methods.

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The Center for Disease Control reports that each year more than 200,000 people across North America will be hospitalized due to seasonal flu and its complications such as pneumonia—and 36,000 of them will die. Seniors make up the majority of these numbers. The Public Health Agency of Canada recommends that everyone be vaccinated for the seasonal flu virus as well as H1N1.

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Falls are the leading cause of injury-related death among those age 75 and older. Once cold weather comes, seniors should be aware of their increased risk for falls. Snow and ice is a danger for anyone who ventures outdoors in winter, but it is especially unsafe for older adults for a variety of reasons.

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