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Caregiver Resources

Comfort Keepers Canada Resources and Recommendations for Family Caregivers

Many friends and family members elect to be the primary caregiver to a senior themselves. Caregiving is a rewarding endeavor, yet it introduces a range of challenges, difficulties, and concerns that demand considerable attention and planning. Family caregivers should take advantage of the many articles and informational resources that are widely available, and they shouldn’t hesitate to seek professional services, including respite care, if they feel the need for assistance.

Below is a collection of articles and resources created by Comfort Keepers Canada to provide information about Caregiver Resources and related topics.

Featured Caregiver Resources Articles:


In-home care providers help senior citizens continue living independently in their own homes, assisting them with the routine tasks of homemaking and personal care. And that frees up more time for seniors to do the things they enjoy. More seniors are directing their interests and talents to volunteer opportunities. They are discovering great fulfillment and purpose in helping others.

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Aphasia is a communication disorder that occurs when the language centers of the brain sustain damage from illness, dementia, or injury. In seniors, the most common cause of aphasia is stroke. Victims of aphasia have difficulty communicating with others and may also have difficulty comprehending what others are saying, and this difficulty can be quite severe or very mild, almost unnoticeable.

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There are many preventable actions that seniors and their families can take to ensure their safety and the safety of their loved ones. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services reports that injuries, many of which are preventable, are the leading cause of disability and death for people of all ages.

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Many studies indicate that although dementia patients experience severe or chronic pain, they regularly receive fewer analgesics than healthy senior adults. This can primarily be attributed to the fact that while a healthy senior can verbalize pain and discomfort, dementia patients, especially those in the late stages, cannot.

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4 to 6 percent of Canadians experience a form of depression called winter-onset Seasonal Affective Disorder *(SAD). Another 10 to 20 percent have milder cases. Many mistakenly write off SAD as the winter blues or cabin fever, but as a recognized type of clinical depression, SAD requires professional diagnosis and attention, the Canadian Mental Health Association advises.

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