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Seniors and Nutrition

Good nutrition contributes to a greater quality of life for seniors

More than 1 in 3 seniors in the care of others is at risk for under- or mal-nutrition (Mayo Clinic/American Dietetic Association). Malnutrition is the lack of proper nutrition, not necessarily a lack of food. Detecting malnutrition in seniors may be difficult, and even seniors who eat enough may be eating the wrong foods to keep themselves healthy. At Comfort Keepers® Canada, we help seniors live healthy, independent lives and promote senior nutrition.

As seniors age and change, so do their nutritional needs. Making sure those needs are met makes a real difference in their quality of life. Caregivers or family members should be aware of the signs and symptoms of hunger or malnutrition in older adults, which include the following:

  • Watch for physical problems, such as poor wound healing, easy bruising and dental difficulties.
  • Keep track of weight loss, which may require purchasing a home scale or transporting the older adult to the doctor’s office for weight checks when the individual is unable to stand without assistance.
  • Pay close attention to seniors’ eating habits and ask them to tell you where and when they eat, but don’t rely on self-reports a lone. Since our caregivers, the people we call Comfort Keepers®, often spend mealtimes with seniors at home, they may have a better idea of normal eating habits.
  • Suggest family members visit during mealtimes, which can improve a senior’s consumption. If a senior lives alone, make sure you know who is buying his or her food.
  • Know what medications an older loved one takes and whether they can affect appetite and digestion. Use the resources available through your local retail pharmacist to check for drug nutrient interactions or possible side effects of prescribed medications.
  • If there are medical questions regarding nutrition, medication, and health, Comfort Keepers suggests seniors, their family members, and other caregivers speak with doctors about tests that can help identify chronic malnutrition or other nutrition-related problems.

Featured Articles on Seniors and Nutrition:


With a little effort, you can slow the telltale signs of aging. Research and senior citizens who exercise and eat a good, balanced diet are proving this. Research at the Buck Institute for Age Research in Novato, Calif., reaffirms the health benefits of exercise and found that it can even reverse the aging process.

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No matter where we live, we expect to find a cornucopia of fruits and vegetables year-round in supermarket produce sections. Nothing beats eating fruits and vegetables at the peak of freshness—when they taste their best and are still fully packed with health-promoting nutrition.

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Hunger and malnutrition prove to be a much greater issue for seniors than younger adults due to a wide range of social circumstances, such as living alone, and health conditions, such as dementia.

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As seniors age they typically become less active and their metabolisms slow. As a result, they require fewer calories. But their need for essential, health-promoting vitamins and minerals does not decline. If anything, it increases.

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Heart healthy foods for seniors and elders. While it is important to begin healthy eating habits early in life, it can be just as vital to good health when healthy eating practices are followed in later years. The effects of some illnesses can be controlled and perhaps averted by practicing good nutritional habits.

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